Revolution and Disintegration series (2011)

Selected images from Flickr with creative commons licenses, and used the ‘blemish tool’ on iPhoto to remove the faces of rioters, scaring the surface of the image so it is obviously corrupted. The blurring of the face was a Brechtian act; seeking to distance the viewer by disturbing the digital illusion that allows us to feel that we are participating in these events – interrupting the immediacy of the image on the screen in our bedroom or office, and it’s apparent ‘presence’ within our world.

The most successful image was printed out and taken repeatedly through a time-intensive process of digitally photographing the print out, and then printing the result so it could be photographed again. The process enabled a slow disintegration, adding distance until the image became an enigmatic faraway scribble, then reversed the process so instead of moving away, the image became closer and closer swallowing the subject, until he disappeared in a ocean of hyper-colour.

Revolution and Disintegration series (2011)

Selected images from Flickr with creative commons licenses, and used the ‘blemish tool’ on iPhoto to remove the faces of rioters, scaring the surface of the image so it is obviously corrupted. The blurring of the face was a Brechtian act; seeking to distance the viewer by disturbing the digital illusion that allows us to feel that we are participating in these events – interrupting the immediacy of the image on the screen in our bedroom or office, and it’s apparent ‘presence’ within our world.

The most successful image was printed out and taken repeatedly through a time-intensive process of digitally photographing the print out, and then printing the result so it could be photographed again. The process enabled a slow disintegration, adding distance until the image became an enigmatic faraway scribble, then reversed the process so instead of moving away, the image became closer and closer swallowing the subject, until he disappeared in a ocean of hyper-colour.